About Leipzig

Warm welcome to Leipzig – we are pleased to have you here in one of the liveliest cities in Germany. Leipzig is a place where tradition meets dynamic and where great art can be enjoyed just a few steps away from the business centre. With a history of almost 1,000 years, Leipzig has become a city of music, of commerce, of technology and industrial development. This Saxon metropolis has earned more than a few claims to fame – as Little Paris, Athens and the Venice of the North. Leipzig also has close connections with many famous geniuses, including Johann Sebastian Bach, Robert Schumann, Richard Wagner, Martin Luther, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller. Many significant events will always be associated with the name of Leipzig.

Furthermore, Leipzig offers many great places for sightseeing which are all close by and easy to reach in walking distance. Architectural styles from a variety of epochs stand alongside each other. Particularly impressive are the Renaissance facade of the Old City Hall and the late baroque interior of St. Nicholas Church.

With around 1,400 restaurants, bars, cafes and pubs Leipzig also offers many possibilities for going out. The city by night is an experience that should not be missed. Music and art lovers in particular will enjoy the wide range of cultural highlights.

Sightseeing

St. Nicholas Church
© Andreas Schmidt

St. Nicholas Church

The St. Nicholas Church is one of the landmarks of Leipzig and the largest church of the city. It was built in 1165, after Leipzig was granted a city charter and market rights. As the most famous church of Leipzig, the St. Nicholas Church became renowned for its Prayers for Peace, which have been held there on every Monday since 1982. Furthermore, the church was the central starting point of the peaceful revolution in 1989, which led to the fall of the Berlin wall. Important buildings on the courtyard

Monument of the Battle of the Nations
© Andreas Schmidt

Monument of the Battle of the Nations

In Memory of the Battle of the Nations in 1813, the monument was inducted around 100 years later, created by Ernst Moritz Arndt. During the battle of Leipzig, the unified armed forces of Russia, Prussia, Austria and Sweden prevailed in a decisive victory over Napoleon on German soil. In the end, soldiers from over 20 nations took part in the battle, 100,000 of them were killed or wounded.

The memorial is constructed in granite and sandstone. Inside, the monument contains two floors. The first floor is known as the crypt and features eight statues representing fallen warriors. The second floor, known as the Hall of Fame, contains four more giant figures. In front of the 91 metres high monument lies the lake of tears for the fallen soldiers.

The monument of the Battle of the Nations is one of the largest in Europe and one of the most famous landmarks of Leipzig.

Panopmeter
© Andreas Schmidt

Panometer

In the former gasometer, built in 1909 to store gas, the artist Yadegar Asisi created 2003 a visual panorama: The Panometer. The name of the Panometer is compounded of “panorama” and “gasometer”. Since 2003 Asisi presents every two years panoramas to specific themes. The panoramic pictures can be watched in 360° view and span around 3,000 square metres. In the area between the panorama and the outer wall is an exhibition on a theme related to the pictures.

The Old Stock Exchange
© Andreas Schmidt

The Old Stock Exchange

The Old Stock Exchange was built in the 17th century in early Baroque style to serve as a prestigious gathering-place for merchants. In 1886, a bigger building was built on Tröndlingring. Since then, the Old Stock Exchange has been used for concerts, theatre performances, literary events and conferences. The building is located at the end of the famous Naschmarkt, which is a place lined with many restaurants and shops.

Leipzig Zoo
© Andreas Schmidt

Leipzig Zoo

Leipzig’s Zoological Garden is one of the oldest in the world. In 1877, it began its existence as the private zoo of Ernst Pinkert. Since 1920, the zoo has been owned by the city of Leipzig and comprises 23.2 hectares. The Leipzig zoo is located in close proximity to the city centre at the edge of the large lowland forest. Currently, over 800 species and 1,600 animals live there. Very popular is the Gondwanaland, a tropical adventure exhibition. In the 16,500 square metres forest landscape, more than 17,000 plants and about 300 different animals can be viewed. Gondwanaland is the biggest tropical hall in Europe.

The Old Townhall and the Market Place
© Andreas Schmidt

The Old Townhall and the Market Place

The Market Place is the historic heart of the city. The Old Townhall, built in 1556, is the oldest building on the square. Since 1909, the Old Townhall has served as the Museum of City History. The building includes a ballroom, which has been used in the past for royal festivals of Saxon’s princes. Court proceedings have also been carried out there. Currently, the ballroom is used for cultural events and concerts. The market place is famous for the traditional Leipziger Weihnachtsmarkt, which takes place every year in December.

Shopping

The Promenades at the Central Train Station

Thanks to its Hauptbahnhof Promenades, Leipzig’s central train station is one of the most modern shopping centres in Germany. Between 1995 and 1997, 142 shops were created on three floors below the main concourse. Fashion, cosmetics, jewellery, electronics, home accessories and foods, the mall offers a wide variety of shops. The Promenades and its two multi-storey car parks are open until 10 pm, and most of the shops are also open on Sunday.

Höfe am Brühl

The new and modern shopping centre was constructed on historic ground on Brühl Street. Over 110 shops with a combined retail area bring together retail, services, gastronomy, quality living and culture. As the name “Höfe” implies, the concept of the shopping mall has followed Leipzig’s long tradition of building passageways and arcades.

Mädler Passage

The Mädler Passage, which leads on to Königshaus- and Messehofpassage, has a selection of luxury shops and boutiques. Round 40 stores and offices are located at the Mädler Passage. The shopping centre is a world-class architectural treasure and was constructed between 1912 and 1914 by Anton Mädler. He created a perfect combination of inner city fair palace and shopping arcade. The stylish boutiques blend harmoniously into the authentic atmosphere of an early 20th-century trade fair exhibition building. Today the Mädler Passage is one of the finest and most visited arcades.

Petersstraße

The Petersstraße is a popular shopping mile in Leipzig and about 366 metres long. The street is a pedestrian zone and offers a variety of fashion and cosmetics shops. In addition to the many shops, there are also a lot of cafes, bars and restaurants.